Speed dating the hague

Another site page offers literature published by 'Austin', photographs etc. They surely will now need further revision to incorporate data published in 'A & P News', the employee magazine of Austin & Pickersgill Limited, specifically in issue No. Alan Vickers has kindly provided scans of two pages from that issue, a two-page spread about the history of the collective 'Austin', derived from the manuscripts of James W. The reference to 'Mills' is apparently to George and John Mills. The 'old slipway', which I presume means the one built in 1846, 'together with rails, cogs, cods, and cradles was taken up and shipped to a buyer in Helsingfors'.

AUSTIN LTD.(1826/1954 - originally founded in 1826, in 1954 became a part of 'Austin & Pickersgill Limited.')Can you help with the history of this company? A part at least of that history would surely be contained in a small 1954 volume of oblong format, published by 'S. Austin & Son, Ltd.' (as per the cover of the volume) or maybe by 'S. A copy of the volume was sold via e Bay for GBP 40.00, in early Sep. The paragraphs that follow have been revised & re-revised over the years as new data has been located. It would seem that there were major changes in 1869 & in the following years as the yard was extended again & again as wooden shipbuilding came to an end & iron shipbuilding became the norm. Now the webmaster has a number of 'Lloyd's Registers' ex 'Google' books available to him (image at left) for what would appear to be most of Thomas Wood's life. But we can tell you that the ship's bell has survived, & a composite image of it is at left, thanks to a kindly site visitor.

A 'Valentines' Series' postcard of the pontoon, #57739, of British manufacture. Tom has provided launch images with everyone identified re 4 vessels (Ardingly, Borde, Hackney & Wallarah) & also another launching image with an 'identity' problem. Per 1 (Board of Trade inquiry into 1876 grounding & loss, ex 'Accounts and Papers', published 1876, a 'Google' book), 2 (ownership in 1858). The Court suspended his certificate for 3 months, but suggested he should be granted a mate's certificate.

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A sign at the site today, shown here (& in the image strip above), in an Alan Collie image, advises us that the pontoon was towed half way around the world to a shipyard in Hong Kong a year or so after the 'Austin' ship building yard was closed. Now it is really not for the webmaster to criticise from afar re such matters, but the sign looks to my eye to be have been 'low budget' - a more distinguished sign, perhaps illustrating the pontoon, might better have been commissioned in the first place to commemorate such a significant part of the city's history.

Certainly the sign, in the summer of 2011, was in urgent need of repair or replacement.

The entire crew took to a longboat which stood by Madeline for a while, lost sight of her in a squall, & never saw her again.

The boats were ordered out & a gig with all the ship's papers was swamped & lost.

22, 1875, the vessel struck three times on a reef to the westward of Dog Island, maybe at West Cay. The pumps were manned but the vessel had 2 feet of water 'in the well' which rapidly became 6 feet.

The Court considered that the Captain had committed an error of judgment, but returned to him his certificate. He also believed that help should have been sought from Anguilla, (Leeward islands, Lesser Antilles), a closer & British possession, rather than from St. Leverten, a tug, attended the scene with Borgwald aboard, but could no nothing.

The Austin 'pontoon' was located on the south bank of the River Wear, just east of the railway & road bridges. Part of the above text originates with a paper written by J. 138, 171, 203, 233, 263, 303, 324, 354, 384, 414, 420.

Visible to all who crossed that bridge, since they just had to look down to see the pontoon & its activity laid out before them. There must be hundreds if not thousands of photos of the pontoon, 'out there' somewhere, taken by passers-by over 60 or more years. In a snippet of data, I read that the yard made a net profit of 51,900 in the year to Apl. And on this site, at page 140 is a list of 'Austin' built vessels, starting in 1831 & ending in 1959. A 2 masted sailing ship carrying square sails & a trysail on a small jackmast.

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