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He named the film Fuck despite anticipating problems with marketing. Scott called the documentary a battle between advocates of morality and supporters of freedom of expression.Animator Bill Plympton provided sequences illustrating key concepts in the film. The Washington Post and the New York Daily News criticized its length and other reviewers disliked its repetitiveness – the word "fuck" is used 857 times in the film.Musician Alanis Morissette comments that the word contains power because of its taboo nature.

Language professor Geoffrey Nunberg observes that the word's treatment by society reflects changes in our culture during the 20th century.

Anderson was exposed to public conceptions surrounding the word "fuck" by comedian George Carlin's monologue "Seven Words You Can Never Say on Television".

Steven Bochco Pat Boone Ben Bradlee Drew Carey Billy Connolly Sam Donaldson Janeane Garofalo Ice-T Ron Jeremy Bill Maher Judith Martin Michael Medved David Milch Alanis Morissette Kevin Smith Tera Patrick Hunter S.

Thompson Fuck is a 2005 American documentary film by director Steve Anderson about the word "fuck".

Anderson said he intended to select interviewees with a variety of perspectives, conservative as well as liberal.

He described how, as confirmations of interview subjects came in, he was surprised when Pat Boone was among the first to confirm his participation.

The documentary includes commentary from film and television writers Kevin Smith and Steven Bochco; comedians Janeane Garofalo, Bill Maher, Drew Carey and Billy Connolly; musicians Chuck D, Alanis Morissette and Ice T; political commentators Alan Keyes and Pat Boone; and journalists Michael Medved and Judith Martin. Fuck includes songs with similarly themed titles, including "Shut Up and Fuck" by American hard rock band Betty Blowtorch, "Fucking Fucking Fuck" by Splatpattern and "I Love to Say Fuck" by American horror punk supergroup Murderdolls.

Journalist Sam Peczek of Culture Wars compared the film's music to that in softcore pornography, and observed that the soundtrack was broad in scope and helped accentuate the film's content.

There were inherent problems with this approach, including an inability to advertise the true title in mainstream media such as The New York Times and Los Angeles Times (they used four asterisks instead), although the real title might be permitted in alternative newspapers such as LA Weekly.

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