Dating bottle glass

The old porcelain pieces show crackled glaze, spots without glaze, and brown-colored edges.The darker the color of edges, the older the shards.I would encourage anyone interested in makers’ marks on beer bottles (and soda bottles) to check out his site…..

dating bottle glass-26

If the glass does not contain air bubbles, it is modern.

If you are not well versed in bottle terminology, use the Bottle Dating Wizard.

Another source of confusion was the common practice of engraving the “G” (especially in the 1880-1920 period) to appear very close in similarity to a “C”, the only difference between the two being a small “tail” pointing in a downward or “southeasterly” direction on the lower right-hand side of the letter G. I will occasionally be adding more data to these pages as I uncover more accurate information.

The info presented on this site is the most accurate I’ve been able to find at present, but any comments (pro or con), clarifications or corrections (preferably backed up with , but please be aware that I’m not an appraisal service, and I may not respond to queries along the general lines of “what is this jar worth?

be a glass manufacturer’s mark and so may not be listed here. Many bottles carry only a number (or numbers) on the base.

This is very frequently the case, especially with soda, mineral water, beer and other bottles of the 1880-1930 period, in which the initial(s) of the “end user” (such as the bottler, brewery, drug manufacturer, or other firm for which the bottle was made) appear embossed on the base. initials of early glass companies) may vary slightly in appearance and punctuation from one bottle to another. These marks usually served as some type of mold identification, indicating a particular mold used by a glass factory.

Other sources of information I have used (including reference books, magazine articles, websites, and in some cases, email or voice communications) would include: Helen Mc Kearin, Rhea Mansfield Knittle, Stephen Van Rennselaer, Harry Hall White, Alice Creswick, Dick Roller, William S. In the meantime, you might try an internet search for more information on these names……there is a wealth of information out there, with many books in libraries and/or online pertaining to glass history, antique glass collecting, glass container manufacturing, and related fields).

Walbridge, Cecil Munsey, Roger Peters, Gene Blasi, Adeline Pepper, Arthur G. This site also utilizes, to some degree, my own research and observations over several years of collecting & studying antique bottles, insulators and other glassware. It has been increasingly more difficult to keep up with answering emails and posts concerning glass bottle markings and related information. In about 50 to 60 percent of the cases, after I answer a query by email, I do not receive the slightest reply or acknowledgement, not even a brief “thank you”.

(CONTINUED from Page 59) China shards are the most helpful in figuring out the time of the former settlement's disappearance - either before the 19th or 20th century.

It is very easy to determine if the shards belong to the plateware manufactured before the 19th century.

for assigning date ranges) especially on marks of pre-1900 bottles. In the great majority of cases, bottles with only numbers on the base are difficult, if not impossible, to attribute to a specific glass maker.

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